Volunteer Update: Hamza Naseer, PhD student in Honour-Based Violence

hamza

Hamza Naseer

Volunteer

Course: PhD Psychology

Thesis: ‘Honour’-Based Violence (HBV) perpetration and victimisation in the UK: The development of a dynamic risk assessment approach. The United Nations (2000) estimates that nearly 5000 women are murdered by their own families in the name of honour every year. ‘Honour’ killings, however, are only a part of the greater problem of ‘honour’ based violence (HBV). In Britain there were over 2,800 cases of HBV reported to the 39 police forces in 2010 alone, and the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation estimates that a further 500 incidents may have been reported to the 13 forces who did not participate in data collection (IKWRO, 2011). My PhD research aims to develop a dynamic approach towards the risk assessment of HBV victimisation and perpetration thus empowering social workers, clinicians, and law enforcement who deal with this type of violence.

Volunteers

Jessica

Jessica Catherine Crawford

Volunteer

 Course: Bsc (Hons) Forensic Psychology

I am a BSc Forensic Psychology student, graduating in Summer 2014. I will be continuing on with the forensic specialism into an MSc heading for full chartership as a Forensic Psychologist, with the possibility of a PhD.

My journey through UCLan and involvement with research has been a hugely fulfilling experience. I feel psychology is a vital subject in such a wide variety of areas. In terms of Forensic psychology it is hugely important in attempting to reduce recidivism by adapting a range of therapeutic interventions that are sculpted to the different types of offenders and individuals. Eyewitness research also has an important place, in influencing the legal system and how a variety of authorities operate, from police to juries, lawyers and judges. Research into Forensic psychology is helping to better understand criminals, crime actions, eyewitness malleability and victimology, to name but a few, and aiming to make our society a safer place to be. I think this is a brilliant opportunity for the public to get engaged with science and realise all it has to offer!


 

Khalid A

Khalid Afzal

Media Officer

Course: Ba (Hons) Media Production

Khalid is a media professional and a fitness instructor at Sir Tom Finney Sports Centre. He sometimes combines both fitness and media in his direction and filming of various bespoke aerobic and zumba videos available online. Khalid is responsible for directing the event’s media staff and producing a top quality video documentary which will be available on our website and youtube.


 

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Theoretical and Applied Aspects of Distraction: An International Symposium

Glen Carrigan - Homoscientificus

Glen Carrigan, John Marsh Symposium ay UCLan, 30th April 2014

Symposium: Theoretical and Applied Aspects of Distraction

The University of Central Lancashire

Wednesday 30th April, (Adelphi Building Lecture Theatre 2), 9: 30 am – 15:00 pm

Organised by Dr John Marsh and Glen Carrigan, University of Central Lancashire


Schedule

  • 9:30 am           Overview of the Symposium by John E. Marsh

Session 1 (9:45 am – 10:45 am):Attentional Capture and Cognitive Control

  • 9:45 am        Jessica K. Ljungberg (Umeå University, Sweden) “What’s In a Name? No More than when it’s Mine Own”: Evidence from Auditory Oddball Distraction
  • 10:00 am     Robert F. Potter (Distinguished Visitor, Indiana University, US) Two Really is Better than One: The Voice Change as a Means to Increase Attention to Radio Messages
  • 10:15 am       Robert W. Hughes (Royal Holloway, University of London) Auditory Distraction: A Duplex-Mechanism Account

  • 10:30 am       John E. Marsh (University of Central Lancashire) Cognitive Control of Distraction: Task Difficulty Eliminates Attenuates…

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Memories in the Making; Neuroscientists Observe Memory Formation

Glen Carrigan - Homoscientificus

mouse brain For the first time in history, neuroscientists are observing memory formation and transmission around the brain of a mammal. Developing on advances in the field of RNA research , this astounding discovery really does reveal how this particular function of the brain might work.

Memory is a complex cognitive process comprising many different facets. Before we have a memory (that which we can reconstruct) it has to be encoded in the brain in some way. This is an ever-changing process that is not entirely understood but what we do know is that an initial phase of encoding must take place; this can involve visual, auditory, olfactory perception and more, with a system of storage following its receipt.

This need to store the memory leads to the alteration of molecular structures in the brain including synapses – think of them as radio antennas, one transmitting a particular signal that needs to hop…

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